Description

Gastrointestinal cancers are one of the leading causes of cancer-related death and morbidity in the United States. Advances in diagnostic capabilities have lead to significant changes in the management of multiple gastrointestinal malignancies, including small hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC), low lying, early stage rectal cancer, and pancreatic cystic noeplasms. In addition, with recent advances in treatment, clinicians have renewed efforts to identify optimal treatment strategies for colorectal cancer with isolated liver metastases, cancers at the gastroesophageal junction, and incidental gallbladder cancers. These rapidly changing advances in care have important implications for health care providers.

Learning Objectives

At the end of this educational activity, participants should be able to:

  • Identify patients at risk for HCC (through surveillance programs) and determine optimal treatment based on diagnosis and staging (to better manage patients with early HCC)
  • Implement guideline concordant management strategies in treating patients with pancreatic cystic neoplasms by appropriately identifying pancreatic cysts and their risk for malignant degradation
  • Identify CRC patients that may benefit from aggressive therapy and surgical resection of hepatic metastases
  • Describe the diagnostic criteria for Barrett’s esophagus including identifying and classifying dysplasia and the effectively use of surveillance endoscopy and recognize the potential risks and benefits of treatment options order to determine the best course of care
  • Determine the different epidemiology/pathologies among cancers in order to adequately triage patients with gastroesophageal junction cancers to perioperative or adjuvant treatment
  • Critically assess the risk of gallbladder cancer upon (routine) cholecystectomies and manage incidentally detected gallbladder cancers with reoperation
  • Assess the risk and management of early rectal cancers

Target Audience

Medical oncologists, surgeons, radiation and interventional oncologists, gastroenterologists, primary care physicians, nurses and other healthcare professionals involved in the diagnosis and management of GI cancers.

Faculty

  • Clinical Co-director, GI Cancer Center, Massachuetts General Hospital
    Director, Pancreas and Biliary Surgery Program, Massachusetts General Hospital
    Professor of Surgery, Harvard Medical School
  • Physician, Department of Surgery/Surgical Oncology, Dana Farber Harvard Cancer Center
    Assistant Professor of Surgery, Harvard Medical School
  • Associate Clinical Director, Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital
    Director, Gastrointestinal Service, Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital
    Assistant Professor of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School
  • Chief, Division of Gastrointestinal and General Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital
    Warshaw Family Professor of Surgery, Harvard Medical School
  • Chief, Division of Surgical Oncology, MGH
    Deputy Clinical Director, Cancer Center, MGH
    Director, Liver Surgery Program, MGH
    Professor of Surgery, Harvard Medical School
  • Director of Hepatobiliary Research, GI Cancer Center, MGH
    Associate Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School

CME Information

 

Accreditation

This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education. This activity has expired.  CME/CE Released: 5/31/2012; Valid for credit through 5/30/2013.  

Credit Designation

Even though this event is no longer accredited, providing information regarding planning, disclosure, and conflict of interest is important to us. This activity was accredited by the Beth Israel Medical Center and St. Luke's and Roosevelt Hospitals. Please see the original CME information below:


Accreditation

This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education through the joint sponsorship of Beth Israel Medical Center, St. Luke's and Roosevelt Hospitals, Massachusetts General Hospital Academy and Reed Medical Education. Beth Israel Medical Center and St. Luke's and Roosevelt Hospitals are accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Credit Designation

Beth Israel Medical Center and St. Luke's and Roosevelt Hospitals designate this continuing medical education activity for a maximum of 2.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)TM. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Policy on Faculty and Provider Disclosure
It is the policy of Beth Israel Medical Center and St. Luke's and Roosevelt Hospitals that faculty and providers disclose real or apparent conflicts of interest relating to the topics of this educational activity, and also disclose discussions of unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or devices during their presentation(s). Beth Israel Medical Center and St. Luke's and Roosevelt Hospitals have established policies in place that will identify and resolve all conflicts of interest prior to this educational activity.


 

Planners

The following planners of this activity have indicated that neither they nor their families have a significant financial interest or affiliation with the manufacturer of any commercial products or provider of commercial services:

Robert J. Birnbaum, MD, PhD: Planner 

John A. Fromson, MD: Planner

Anan Nathif, EdM: Planner 

Tristan Gorrindo, MD: Planner 


 

Speakers

 

The following speakers of this activity have indicated that neither they nor their spouse/partner have a relevant financial relationship to disclose:

Carlos Fernandez-del Castillo, MD

Christina R. Ferrone, MD

Theodore S. Hong, MD

David W. Rattner, MD

The following speaker and/or planners have reported receiving something of value from a company whose product may be germane to the content of their presentations:

Kenneth K. Tanabe, MD

Consulting:

Morningside Technology LLC, LEK Consulting, Summer Street Research Partners

Royalties: 

UpToDate

Last Updated: 9/22/10

Andrew X. Zhu, MD, PhD

 

Advisory:

Bayer, Pfizer, Novartis

Last Updated: 12/2/10


Hardware/Software Specifications: 

This internet-based CME activity is best experienced using Internet Explorer 8+, Mozilla Firefox 3+, Safari 4+. This Web site requires that JavaScript and session cookies be enabled. Certain activities may require additional software to view multimedia, presentation, or printable versions of the content. These activities will be marked as such and will provide links to the required software. That software may be: Adobe Flash, Adobe Acrobat, Microsoft PowerPoint, and Windows Media Player.

Optimal System Configuration: 
Flash Player: Adobe Flash Player 10.1+ 
Browser: Firefox 3+, Internet Explorer 8.0+, Safari 4.0+, or Google Chrome 7.0+ 
Operating System: Windows XP+ or Mac OS X 10.4+ 
Internet Connection: 1 Mbps or higher

Minimum Requirements: 
Windows PC:
500-MHz Pentium II; Windows XP or higher; 128 MB RAM; Video Card at least 64MB of video memory; Sound Card at least 16-bit; Macromedia Flash Player 10 or higher, audio playback with speakers for programs with video content; Firefox 1.1+, Internet Explorer 7.0+, Safari 1.0+, Google Chrome, or Opera 
Macintosh:
Mac OS X 10.3 or higher with latest updates installed; 1.83MHz Intel Core Duo or faster; RAM: 128MB or more; Video Card: at least 64MB of video memory; Sound Card: at least 16-bit

 

 

 

Supporters

This program has received support in the form of educational grants from the following companies: